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ADV NewsBMW Website Reveals R1300GS, R1400GS & M1300GS On The Way

BMW Website Reveals R1300GS, R1400GS & M1300GS On The Way

Leaked: The Bavarian brand is expected to go bigger on its flagship GS model.

Published on 04.03.2022
A new clue has been uncovered, revealing BMW is going big, ah, even bigger with its flagship GS lineup, with three new models on the way to include an R1300GS, M1300GS and – get this – an R1400GS. 

These designations were discovered by motorcycle.com‘s sleuth Dennis Chung, who unearthed them listed prematurely on BMW’s own service request website. The entries have since been deleted from the site, but not before screenshots were captured and news started to travel. 

We reported that a new, significantly overhauled R1300GS model was on the way when a heavily disguised test mule was spotted last summer. Corresponding trademark filings gave away the prototype’s capacity as 1300cc and also suggested a higher-spec, special edition “M” 1300GS version, something along the lines of BMW’s M1000RR, was also on the way.

BMW website leak shows R1300GS, R1400GS, M1300GS adventure motorcycles
BMW website leak shows R1300GS, R1400GS, M1300GS adventure motorcycles
Images motorcycle.com

What raises eyebrows about the designations on BMW’s service website is the admission there will also be a R1400GS model. And yes, at first glance it does seem an odd choice for BMW to build an even bigger GS when no one is pining for more power of heft from their adventure bike, but the nomenclature is likely explained when you consider the hierarchy of the company’s middleweight GS lineup, which includes the budget-minded F750GS, a standard edition F850GS, and then the up-spec’d F850GS Adventure. All share BMW’s 853cc inline twin. Triumph plays similar sleight of hand with its 900cc “Tiger 850 Sport”.


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Following the logic of the 850 series would mean this new GS line would be powered by a 1400cc engine, which seems rather extreme. However, the displacement and corresponding power bump could be explained as an effort to simply maintain current power outputs ahead of Europe’s ever-tightening emissions standards. All fine, as long as we’re not adding weight. 

So, we know the M1300GS will have some doodads aplenty and its boxer twin will likely be tuned for max thrills, while the R1300GS will be the standard Goldilocks edition. The mystery is whether the R1400GS will be the new flagship, off-road oriented GS Adventure edition, or perhaps a long-legged, more tour-oriented bike to compete with Ducati’s Multistrada V4, with a GSA version to follow a year later, as is sometimes BMW’s game plan. 

Either way, last summer’s spy shots revealed these new GS bikes will differ greatly from those of the current generation. Despite the prototype’s extreme camouflage we could make out larger radiators, which, in combination with temporary cylinder head shrouding that blocked nearly all air flow to the engine, told us this new boxer will likely be fully liquid cooled this time around, jettisoning the current targeted air- and oil cooling system on the current R1250 series. 

BMW website leak shows R1300GS, R1400GS, M1300GS adventure motorcycles
Photo Motorrad | bmh-images

The chassis is more of a mystery, covered as it is on the test mule by a decoy “frame,” that was nothing more than fake white frame tubes floating on a black plastic panel. The bike’s front suspension is also a puzzle since the spoked front wheel looks to be suspended by a traditional fork instead of a Telelever unit, long a staple on top of the line BMW GS models. The central spring and strut of the Telelever system is usually visible between the fork legs, but only a steering stabilizer can be seen on this prototype.

As for aesthetics, the GS test mule’s shape would be unrecognizable if it weren’t for the hallmark cylinders jutting from each side. As is, the whole headlamp and windscreen assembly are a radical departure from traditional GS issue. Of special interest is the obvious void between the lamp and screen which is likely to house a radar lens that would allow for the adaptive cruise control that BMW has announced is on the way.  Around the rear of the prototype you can see a corresponding slot on the panel that holds the license plate. 

In addition to the prototype’s revamped snout, a rudimentary, seamless uni-fairing likely hides new componentry and possibly a new tank shape.

Though the accidental listing of the three new GS models on BMW’s service website has since been deleted, we did note there was no model year included for these bikes. We’d put our money on 2023 for the model year, with promotions launching sometime in late 2022. 

Author: Jamie Elvidge

Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.

Author: Jamie Elvidge
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George Edwin Erasmus
George Edwin Erasmus
April 3, 2022 10:45 am

Just what we need another bloated Adventure bike

Joe John
Joe John
April 3, 2022 2:22 pm

There is just nothing that looks even remotely fun about that bike.

Ryugo
Ryugo
April 6, 2022 10:28 am
Reply to  Joe John

Buy something else and enjoy it.

Those of us who love touring 2up in confort will enjoy new 1400 GSA, and won’t be telling you how your bike is not fun, because the whole point of motorcycling diversity is for everyone to find something they like. So ride what you like, and don’t stress out too much about us that like boxer engine.

Bård Reil
Bård Reil
April 6, 2022 7:08 pm
Reply to  Ryugo

A very solid point. Even though I personally think the GSs have kind of lost their original intent, any rider is of course free to have a different view.
I have for many years had an old GSA with the steel tank and I love it. Still I bought a Husky 701 Long Range, got a travel tower with a proper windscreen and several LED lights, “Seat Concepts” XL comfort seat, bar risers, lowered pegs, an OEM exoskeleton to carry any weight I want, a tank bag, a Scott steering damper and a carbon low front fender.
Yes, I’ve spent a fortune on the Husky, but now I have a proper travel/adventure bike weighing 200 lbs less than the GSA, being able to do whatever the Beemer can, and more.
IMHO, on such a bike you can’t beat low weight, but everyone is free to differ. Nowadays I always pick the Husky when I go for a ride. But of course, being an old man I probably drive slower than young people, and I stop more often to enjoy the beautiful scenery here in Norway.

Joe John
Joe John
April 19, 2022 3:05 pm
Reply to  Ryugo

Don’t get your panties in a bunch. Just my opinion.

Ryugo
Ryugo
April 19, 2022 11:57 pm
Reply to  Joe John

Smart people form strong opinion that they want to share with rest of the world after they try something. But we all know what opinions are like, and everyone has one.

Baard Reil
Baard Reil
April 5, 2022 11:07 am

IMO, the last attractive GS was the last year produced 1150 GSA with the enormously fat steel tank. I know BMW sells a lot of the modern plastic beasts, but I think they’ve outgrown the idea which started the success; the true nimble rally bikes from the (also true) Paris-Dakar era.
I will be surprised if these new GS(A)s continue to outsell almost all other ideas of a motorcycle concept worldwide. My prediction for this segment’s top choice in a few years: an adventure bike having 80-100 hp, weighing less than 170kg, with a minimum of 500km range.

Steve
Steve
July 20, 2022 3:22 pm
Reply to  Baard Reil

I had that bike, still my favorite, should have never sold my mint GSA!

Dylan J Bennett
Dylan J Bennett
March 27, 2023 2:06 pm
Reply to  Baard Reil

I’m with you on the steel tanks. Never owned an 1150GS, but I took my 1200GS-LC from New York to Honduras and back, plus all across the US, and it never failed me (even after a pothole on a Mexican highway sent it flying 75ft through the air, I was able to ride it off and continue my trip… just needed the handlebars slightly realigned, although I did need a new front coilover after I got back from that year south of the border; how I survived almost completely unscathed after being ejected at 75kmph like that… well, I now believe in divine intervention). Still, I felt the plastic always seemed cheap and tacky. I think they had to go with plastic (or “polymer” as they like to say since it sounds fancier than plastic) because in order to add more power with bigger engines, and the added weight of a liquid cooling system, they had to drop the weight of the metal. That means either thinning out the metal parts, or using lighter and less durable metals.

Not that it couldn’t be done, and at the 12XXGS’s price point, they could have made the tank out of titanium, but still. That said, if I could get any GS-series bike, it would be the GS’s used by the cops in California. Not the CHP (I don’t think), but I’ve seen cops in Cali on custom R1200GS-LCs, replacing all the plastic parts (even the intake cowlings) with that nice shiny white, traditional metal. They also have much beefier, full crash bars than BMW offers for its civillian lineup, and more intuitive multi-function hand controls for things like sirens, lights and radio (which could be for fog lights, phone control, etc., in civvy models).

The other thing of the plastic, is that it is MUCH cheaper to fix than metal is. It is also actually more durable for real “adventure” purposes. I mean, if you’re riding fully loaded through sandy, rocky and muddy roads and trails in developing nations, you’re going to drop the bike— it’s a matter of when, not if. Between the unknown and changing terrain, the weight of the load throwing off the center balance of the bike, and just plain fatigue after eight or nine hours of that, eventually you’ll put your foot down in a hole or something and fall over, or you’ll slide out when the paved road you’re cruising down suddenly becomes a pit of soft sand, or whatever. The plastic holds its shape. If plastic cracks, you can fix it with JBWeld (hell, you can make replacement parts out of JBWeld). Also, BMW bikes last, arguably, longer than most other bikes on the road, so the resale market is huge, especially for dealers. It costs a lot less to just screw on some modular plastic parts that may be scratched up, than to replace an entire metal gas tank that was dented.

When it comes to your vision of the adventure bike of the future, I concur. I think the secret will lie in Hub-Center electric motors, similar to the motor-assisted bicycles out today, but with improved efficiency, power density and energy storage systems. Put in the front wheel, there would not need to be any mechanical linkage, it’s all self contained (think a fan, with the motor mounted to the forks), when they’re manually turned (i.e. when the bike is pushed by the engine, is coasting, etc.) they regenerate power. Just a 15-20HP electric motor (providing full torque at just a few RPMs) would be sufficient. Combine that with a turbo (low RPM lack of torque of the FI engine would be made up by the motor, and when the rear wheel slip is detected, the front wheel increases power, to pull through turns). A 15kWh battery pack, plus a 15L tank and 500+km of range.

Robert
Robert
April 5, 2022 12:16 pm

The worlds most overrated motorcycle gets bigger. Why?

John
John
April 6, 2022 6:47 pm

Why would anyone want these???!

Jugo Radonic
Jugo Radonic
April 7, 2022 12:55 am

I never said weight is a good thing, but it’s not really a big concern either when it comes to normal travel. It’s only a problem to those that buy ADV bike and then use it as if it was enduro.

There is a big difference in riding on unpaved roads, and no roads at all. For the latter, I’d pick better tool for the job as well.

Sam Hill
Sam Hill
April 13, 2022 7:27 pm

Interesting at least. The bike appears a little shorter and also evident is an aluminum frame. Generally the RT version follows suite as the GS and RT share some basic platforms. Hence the R1400 engine for more touring power and heavy loads. I hope for a more user friendly version, lighter weight, feet on the ground as on the new KTM 1290 ADV S & R as well as the Harley Pan America. By the end of this summer there should be many more sightings. I’m just hoping for a revised R1400RS with all the attributes of power and weight saving for spirited touring. Good job Ms Elvidge. Spot on for the future. Safe Rides to you.

Mike from Switzerland
Mike from Switzerland
April 21, 2022 6:49 am

Well, well, I’ am always amazed how motorbike riders diss BMW GS riders or talk bad aboutthe bike as such and in particular the GS ADV. There can be several reasons, starting from ignorance, misunderstanding of the concept, envy because the bike is (too) expensive, false pride on the own brand one is driving etc.
In over 40 years I have driven pretty much everything that is out there and yes there are very nice bikes and for a hardcore enduro trip I would also choose something with 450 ccm and 160kg, and for the race track something with four cylinders in line and 200bhp plus and under 200kg.
But this is not the point. Fact is, that GS in all shape and sizes have been by far the best selling bikes across Europe for so many years now. Claiming that all those biker are stupid, or incompetent or thet the bike is sh*t only disqualifies those who make these comments.
Ride whetever you want and I respect you as a biker. You share our passin and that is all that counts.
And yes: I will definitely add a r1300 or 1400 ADV to my collection and yes it replaces the R 1250 ADV.

Ride safe

Michael Scott
Michael Scott
May 12, 2022 6:35 pm

Be careful of making assumptions. Fact: can’t really tell what the bike is from the photo but its most likely a new model. Fact: Bike names were listed on a BMW service website. Assumption: names on website relate to the bike in the photo. Hypothesis: Photo and names are unrelated and BMW was throwing you off the scent? Why build a R13 and R14?!

One thing I am confident of…there will be a 2023 anniversary model to celebrate 100 years of motorcycle manufacture. Will probably be released September 2023 to coincide with Sept 1923 release of R32 model.

Fact: BMW GS is the pinnacle of motorcycles. Suck it up… 🙂

Eric Austin
Eric Austin
June 15, 2022 11:40 pm

For those who diss the gs range it’s fine shut up and don’t buy one! For the rest of us we’ll just keep enjoying just how fantastic they really are, the best all rounder by far

rcknrog11
rcknrog11
June 16, 2022 9:54 am
Reply to  Eric Austin

Absoflippinglutely!!!!

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