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ADV Bikes2024 Royal Enfield Himalayan 452 First Ride Review

2024 Royal Enfield Himalayan 452 First Ride Review

India’s popular ADV gets a modern makeover and new levels of performance.

Published on 11.14.2023
2024 Royal Enfield Himalayan Review

It was the first time I’ve been to a press launch, and probably the last, where the presenter declares the new engine makes 65% more power than its predecessor. That dramatic change pretty much encapsulates the extensive transformation the new Royal Enfield Himalayan has undergone for 2024, with a revamp that not only promises a significant boost in power, but improved handling and off-road capability as well. 

2024 Royal Enfield Himalayan Review

The original Himalayan, introduced in 2017, has been a staple of the Royal Enfield lineup, providing riders with an approachable adventure platform with retro styling and an affordable price tag. Since its introduction, some 200,000 Himalayan motorcycles have been sold. The 2024 model aims to build on this legacy, incorporating significant updates across the board that address many of the shortcomings of its predecessor. To achieve this, Royal Enfield has taken into consideration feedback from riders and critics alike, resulting in a machine that has gone through quite a transformation to reach its final form.

2024 Royal Enfield Himalayan Review

Recently, I had the opportunity to put the all-new Himalayan through its paces on the rugged roads of the Himalayas. But before we dive into the details of how this latest iteration fared in the unforgiving terrain that inspired its name, let’s briefly review what’s changed.

What’s New?

2024 Royal Enfield Himalayan Review

The all-new Himalayan is a departure from its predecessor in several key aspects. One of the most notable changes is the new 452cc water-cooled DOHC engine providing a significant boost of 39.5 horsepower compared to the 24 of the previous air-cooled 411cc unit. Torque has also increased from 23.6 ft-lbs to 29.5 ft-lbs. Plus the transmission gets a new 6th gear, and the engine is now used as a stressed member in a significantly stiffened twin spar frame.

2024 Royal Enfield Himalayan Review
2024 Royal Enfield Himalayan Review

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Suspension components have been upgraded to Showa, featuring larger 43mm USD forks and a beefed up shock with an increase in rear wheel travel from 7.1 inches to 7.9 inches to match the front. Royal Enfield also beefed up the swingarm and axles, widened the wheels, put a wider tire out back (140mm vs 120mm), upgraded the handlebars from ⅞” to 1-⅛” units, added larger brakes, and improved the build quality of the chassis overall.

2024 Royal Enfield Himalayan Review
2024 Royal Enfield Himalayan Review

As before, the Himalayan rides on a 21” front and 17” rear wheel but there is a new cross-spoke tubeless option available on the higher-spec variants. The bike comes standard with upper crash bars, plus serrated footpegs with removable rubber covers, center stand, a reinforced plastic skid plate, and there’s a rear rack for carrying luggage. The seat height is now 1 inch taller but features a two-position adjustable seat (32.5 inches low / 33.3 inches high). Plus there is a low seat option that gets the low and high saddle heights down to 31.7 inches and 32.5 inches respectively. Both range and fuel efficiency are improved as well, with help from a larger 4.5-gallon fuel tank. Turn signals have also been upgraded from the rigid type to new off-road friendly units with flexible stalks.

2024 Royal Enfield Himalayan 452 Review
2024 Royal Enfield Himalayan 452 Review

A new set of electronics are a major shift, with the Himalayan now offering four ride modes for configuring two fuel maps and two ABS settings. ABS can only be turned off on the rear wheel and ride modes are switchable only when stopped.The analogue dash of the old Himalayan has now been replaced with a 4” round color-TFT display called the Tripper Dash. Left side thumb switches are used to control settings and change the display, which features integrated maps and advanced navigation features powered by Google Maps, along with a digital compass. Plus it has LED lighting all around.

2024 Royal Enfield Himalayan 452 Review

Key Upgrades

Powerplant: 452cc, DOHC, 4-valve, single-cylinder ‘Sherpa’ engine boosts power from 24 HP to 39.5 HP and torque from 23.6 ft-lbs to 29.5 ft-lbs. The transmission also now has 6 gears instead of 5. 

Frame/Swingarm: New twin spar steel frame is stiffer and uses the engine as a stressed member. Also narrower in the center for improved stand up ergos. Swing arm has been beefed up for improved stability.

Chassis: New Himalayan is 7 pounds lighter and has also been redesigned with a lower center of gravity. 

Wheels: Wider wheels with new cross-spoke tubeless option available in up-spec variants.

New Himalayan Review

Suspension: New Showa 43mm USD forks. New Showa rear shock now with .8 inches more suspension travel. Damping and spring rates have been optimized. Ground clearance was raised by .5 inches.

Fuel Capacity: New 4.5-gallon fuel tank offers .5 gallons more capacity.

Brakes: ByBre brakes feature larger discs — 320mm in front (+ 20mm) and 270mm in the rear (+ 30mm).

Technology: New 4” round color-TFT Tripper Dash with integrated map navigation system and entertainment features for enhanced rider convenience. New four-option selectable rider modes (Power with ABS On, Power with ABS Off, Eco with ABS On, Eco with ABS Off).

First Impressions

Our journey through the Himalayan mountains covered around 250 miles over two days, with elevation ranging from 7,000 to 11,000 feet, providing an immersive test of the new model’s capabilities. 

New Himalayan 452 Review

It was some of the most dangerous roads I’ve ever ridden on before with threats coming from all directions, including oncoming passing cars, giant potholes, herds of goats, stray dogs crossing the road, sleeping cows in the road, you name it. The asphalt can end without warning, turning into a rocky track that cars, cabs and tuk tuks were somehow able to traverse. It’s pretty wild and that’s before you even get to the iconic Himalayan roads high in the mountains with steep cliffs dropping off into nowhere. And of course vehicles drive on the left side of the road but really, any lane is fair game in this chaotic environment.

New Himalayan Review

Jumping on the Himalayan for the first time was quite a difference from the old model. My first reaction was ‘wow this thing has Power!’. It feels like it revs to the moon compared to the old long-stroke, slow revving 411 engine. But with that new power also comes new vibrations. We rode throughout the two days with rubber covers installed on the footpegs and at higher revs there was a significant amount of vibration coming through the pegs, and a moderate amount through the bars. The vibes weren’t noticed in the lower RPMs though and luckily the bike doesn’t need to live in the upper revs to make decent power like it did in the past.

Another thing I quickly noticed is the bike feels a lot more solid. With its stiffened frame, beefier fork, axels and swingarm, along with a wider rear tire, it’s a much more stable platform. The handling felt precise and, dare I say, sporty. The old Himalayan felt a bit lazy and flexed a lot when pushed. It had that ‘old bike’ feel even though it was launched in 2017.

Something that hasn’t changed much is the ergonomics when sitting. Handlebars feel comfortably placed and your knees fit easily inside the tank cutouts, without rubbing against the upper crash bars, even at my height, 6 foot 2 inches. I did notice with the seat in the low position that my legs felt slightly cramped but that was alleviated with a quick change to the High seat position. The seat also felt comfortable, like the old Himalayan, but now there’s more leg room and less of a knee bend for taller riders.

New Himalayan Review

Royal Enfield’s new Tripper Dash is actually a pretty cool piece of tech. It’s got a classic analog look but rendered on a crisp color-TFT display. It displays all the pertinent information you need to keep track of like temperature, trip details, speed, fuel range, and RPM. But what really sets it apart is the ability to navigate with turn-by-turn directions using an integrated Google map, placed right in the middle of your field of vision. It’s also compatible with both Android and Apple phones. Throughout our test we were comfortably able to navigate our way on unfamiliar roads, even when separated from the group. And with a good LTE signal nearly everywhere we rode, I was able to enjoy streaming some Indian pop music on my headset.

New Himalayan Review

On The Road

Smooth and twisty asphalt sections usually didn’t last for more than a few miles but we did get a chance to push the bike’s limits in the turns. Indian-made CEAT GRIPP tires had a decent amount of grip at full lean angle, even on dusty, not so smooth surfaces, and with more ground clearance on tap there was no premature peg scraping in the turns.

New Himalayan Review

Previously, the bike had flexy forks and soft suspension that gave it a vague feeling in the turns. As a lighter-weight bike the old Himalayan had some built-in agility and you could ride it fast once it got up to speed but it did so like a reluctant mule. The new suspension now feels firm and well damped, soaking up bumps without any wallow. This new-found stability and control makes the new model much more fun to ride fast.

Braking performance, though initially underwhelming, improved as the brake pads warmed up. They require at least two fingers to get good braking performance out of them. I was expecting a larger improvement with the new larger discs, but it is a step forward nonetheless. There’s also now a slipper clutch, which came in handy during several emergency stops I performed.

New Himalayan Review
Improved ground clearance means the footpegs are less likely to scrape on the ground when getting it leaned over in the turns.

The 450’s improved power delivery also made it more enjoyable to ride. It’s not enough power to need traction control or to get the rear wheel spinning, but enough to pull the front wheel off the ground in first gear. Which is impressive considering we were riding at high elevation. The transmission shifts smoothly too as you bang through the gears exploring the upper revs. That 40 horsepower proved to be plenty for quick passing maneuvers and we had more acceleration than most everyone else on the road.

New Himalayan 452 Review

Playing around with the electronics, the Performance fuel map gives a precise, punchy throttle response and full power to the rider. Once you switch it over to Eco mode, the Ride-by-Wire system takes over to transform the motor into a less-snappy, slower revving version of itself. Royal Enfield engineers didn’t have any numbers on hand for fuel efficiency gains in the Eco mode but assured us that the smoother roll on of the throttle would result in more MPGs. Testing in a mixture of Performance and Eco mode, on both street and dirt, we recorded an average of 61.6 MPG, which translates into a range of about 277 miles. Eco is also great for riding in the rain or for new riders learning the ropes.

New Himalayan Review

As for mode switching, unfortunately the modes can’t be switched on the fly and require the rider to stop to make a change. I’m not sure if this is by design or a legal department limitation, but it’s a clunky implementation. Realistically though, riders will likely not be changing between modes very frequently.

While there was no place to test any highway cruising, there were a few long straights where we could open up the throttle. With the new Himalayan’s noticeably longer gearing, we rarely ever needed to throw it into the new 6th gear. When we did, the revs dropped significantly, as well as any vibes. Vibes were primarily noticeable during acceleration. Considering the increase in vibes, it’s surprising the Royal Enfield decided to go with what looks like smaller bar-end weights. We’ll have to do more testing in the States on major interstate highways to see if the vibration is a problem but it feels like the bike will cruise comfortably at 65-70 mph like the old Himalayan. Although, with power on tap to make a pass or handle steep grades with a head wind.

New Himalayan Review

One drawback I did notice at higher speeds is the new windscreen. While the stubby-style smoked screen looks cool, it doesn’t offer much protection. The old Himalayan windscreen was much taller and wider, offering an ample amount of wind protection for a taller rider like myself (6’2”). Those looking for more protection will need to check out the tall touring windscreen option available in the Royal Enfield accessories catalog. And while you’re at it, a set of accessory hand guards would also be a nice upgrade for some additional wind protection on the hands.

In The Dirt

New Himalayan Review

As we ventured deeper into the Himalayas, the asphalt transformed into continuous dirt roads, presenting a different set of challenges. With numerous blind turns, rock fall on the road, and sheer cliffs on every corner, you had to maintain your full attention and avoid gazing too long at the majestic mountains and turquoise-blue waters running in the rivers below.

Standing up on the pegs the bars feel lower than before, especially for a bigger rider like myself. However, Royal Enfield does have a taller bar bend in their accessories catalog for those who want to customize their bikes at point of purchase. One significant upgrade though is the use of 1-1/8″ aluminum fat bars compared to the old 7/8″ steel bars that would easily bend on the first drop. 

New Himalayan Review
New 1-1/8″ handlebars are much beefier than before but also a tad lower.

The foot pegs are a decent size to stand on and appear similar in shape and design to the old serrated pegs. There’s a big difference though when standing on the pegs in terms of leg room. Previously, the passenger peg mounts would bow your calves out a bit. Now they’ve repositioned everything and made the bike skinnier in the middle so you can stand straight over the pegs. 

New Himalayan Review

The tank is also skinnier at the seat junction, making it easier to grip it with your knees while standing or sitting. It’s shorter front to back as well, so it’s easier to slide up in the saddle and get your head over the bars during aggressive off-road riding.

New Himalayan Review
The fuel tank is slimmer near the seat junction, allowing you to easily grip it with your knees.

That same lightweight feel and nimble handling noticed on the street carries over to dirt and the new Himalayan feels almost enduro like once off-road. With the old model if you tried riding it fast in rough terrain, the chassis felt flexy and imprecise. Now it goes where you point it and doesn’t get knocked off line easily.  

New Himalayan Review

There’s some built-in forgiveness too, with an opportunity to recover from a front end tuck if you get into a turn a little hot. Those CEAT tires were also not bad off-road, considering they look like an 80% street / 20% dirt tire. Although, we didn’t hit any deep sand or mud to really test them.

New Himalayan Review

On day two, we ventured into more technical terrain that allowed us to better explore the bump absorption capabilities. Over smaller rocks, the suspension feels fairly plush with good damping control — much less bouncy than the old Himalayan. There’s still no damping adjustment for the fork or shock, just preload in the rear which I cranked up for my 215-pound frame. The standard damping settings for compression and rebound felt spot on though for this environment. And the big 21″ front wheel helped the bike stay composed while rolling over big rocks.

New Himalayan Review
New Himalayan Review
Even when getting it full airborne, the new Himalayan’s improved suspension did not bottom out.

I did my best to find big ruts, dips and even jumps during the test in an attempt to bottom out the bike, but to no avail. The new suspension is much stiffer than before in the last part of the stroke and resists bottoming a whole lot better. The higher ground clearance means the skid plate is less likely to touch and the rear linkage is now tucked in tighter to keep it out of harm’s way. We’ll have to get it out in more extreme terrain once we get a test unit back in the States to see where its limits are but from this initial test, it’s certainly a major improvement in bump absorption.

New Himalayan Review

As for the new 452 engine, acceleration is peppy but not enough to break loose the tire easily in the dirt. It’s a very tractable motor and now has enough juice to get up steep hills without abusing the clutch — a common issue with the previous model. In Performance mode, the rev up is faster than the old 411 long-stroke engine. But that old lazy power feel can be revived by simply switching it into Eco mode, which is actually useful off-road to avoid slippage in loose terrain. Since there’s no traction control, you’re always getting power to the rear wheel to help maintain forward momentum. It’s just smoothed out to encourage traction. I highly recommend it for novice off-road riders.

New Himalayan Review

Braking performance, while not impressive on the road, was better in the dirt. Front and rear stoppers exhibited good feel over rough terrain, without any grabbing, and could be actuated with a single finger. Switching it into an ABS ‘Off’ mode however does require pulling over and it loses the setting any time you cycle the key. The ‘always on’ front ABS works fine in most situations but it’s not the most advanced system and I did have a few pucker moments on rocky descents that had me wishing I could turn ABS off completely. Luckily, you can still pull the ABS fuse if you prefer to ride without it off-road. 

Durability 

Over two days and more than a few hundred miles of testing, these bikes took a beating. I remember the first few tests of the original Himalayan, we saw bolts on the exhaust, steering stem and foot controls jiggling loose. Nothing that a little loctite couldn’t fix but annoying nonetheless. Now everything on the bike seems to be built to higher standards. The welds look cleaner, the bolts are better quality, tubing is beefed up, it’s a higher level of fit and finish.

New Himalayan Review

The one problem we did have, and it occurred on a few different bikes, was loosening mirrors. Even after cranking them back down, they seemed to loosen up again. Another question mark is the new ‘plastic’ skid plate. While the old Himialayan’s sheet metal skid plate didn’t put up much of a fight against big rocks, at least it was metal. Again, there is a more heavy-duty skid plate option available in the Royal Enfield accessories catalog.

The bikes do seem to take a fall pretty well though. On a stretch of dirt where a stream crossed the trail, the rider in front of me suddenly went down without warning and I immediately realized there must be ice ahead. But before I could react, my bike slid out 180 degrees and hit the ground with a light thunk. No visible damage could be seen other than a few light scratches and a loosened mirror. From what I can tell, these bikes seem engineered to take a fall well.  And for those still skeptical about Royal Enfield’s build quality, the new Himalayan will come with a 3-year unlimited-mile warranty in North America. 

The Bottom Line

The 2024 Royal Enfield Himalayan is undeniably a significant step forward in the evolution of the model. More power, precise handling, and enhanced on and off-road capabilities make it a better motorcycle in every way. However, it’s essential to acknowledge the shift in character from the old Himalayan.

New Himalayan Review

For a lot of riders, the old Himalayan was a refreshing, back-to-basics machine. Despite its lack of power, the air-cooled powerplant had its charm and was a simpler bike to maintain with fewer electronics to go wrong. It also had a look that could easily be mistaken for a bike that came from the 80s or earlier. The new Himalayan looks more like a neo-retro version of itself, which is kind of strange considering it was first introduced a few years ago. 

The difference in what you experience while riding is night and day as well. With the old Himilayan, there wasn’t much performance on tap so you got settled into a slower pace and focused more on your surroundings, smelled the flowers so to speak. Now with more power and an improved chassis, the Himalayan invites you to ‘explore the limit’ and ride at a faster pace, putting your focus more towards what’s directly in front of you.

New Himalayan Review

The old Himalayan had its quirks of course but it was all somehow excusable because of the simplistic design and low purchase price. Royal Enfield probably could have just added a few more horsepower and some mild improvements, then called it a day. Instead, while trying to chase down every flaw, they significantly modernized the platform, along with the look, turning it into something quite different from the original design. 

Price remains a crucial factor and the new Himalayan is expected to enter the market at a higher cost than its predecessor. Royal Enfield Head Siddhartha Lal assured us at the launch that the price increase would be smaller than we might expect. We’ll get a better idea of the increase when the bike is released in India later this month.

New Himalayan Review

Did Royal Enfield miss the mark changing the Himalayan so drastically? I don’t think so. It’s definitely not some soulless, technocentric machine. It’s got a cool look and character of its own, just different from its predecessor. But as much as I like the new Himalayan, I hate to see the old one go. I think there’s still a place in the market for an inexpensive, capable, low-tech, adventure bike with retro looks. Luckily, the company plans to keep the platform around for the time being, in the form of the Scram 411.

Royal Enfield has been on a mission lately. They want to compete with the best motorcycle brands at the highest level, and they are making a statement with the release of the new Himalayan. Whether it’s the company execs or a random Royal Enfield owner riding the streets of India, you can feel there’s national pride at stake.

New Himalayan Review

The new Himalayan was built with passion and it meets the needs of what many adventure riders have been asking for. Assuming its price tag lands somewhere in the $6500-$7,400 USD range, it’s going to force other manufacturers to re-analyze their offerings in the burgeoning 300-600cc middleweight Adventure Bike category.

The current Himalayan costs $5,449 here in the states and its greatest competition is the KTM 390 Adventure, which is priced at $7,399. How does it compare to the 390? The new Himalayan has more torque, more equipment, and is better off-road, although it is a bit heavier. Existing models in this power/price category include the Honda CB500X (now called the NX500) and Kawasaki KLR650, both of which are outclassed by the more well-rounded Himalayan. 

New Himalayan Review

The 2024 Himalayan is a commendable effort by Royal Enfield. In the past, it was often referred to as a “great bike for the price.” With all of its improvements, it’s now just a “great bike.” It’s not just a bike for newer riders either, now there’s plenty of performance for more experienced riders to enjoy riding it too. What the new Himalayan proves is that a 450cc single platform might just be the new goldilocks zone for adventure bikes where weight, power, price and capability come together in an ideal combination. As Royal Enfield says, “It’s everything you need and nothing more.”

New Himalayan Review

The new Himalayan will be released to the public in India Nov 24th with five different color options: Hanle Black, Slate Himalayan Salt, Kaza Brown, Kamet White, and Slate Poppy Blue. We should see it appear in Europe in early spring, and after that Royal Enfield says it’s expected to arrive on North American shores sometime in early summer of 2024. For more details, check out the Royal Enfield website and we’ll keep you posted on future developments.

2024 Royal Enfield Himalayan Specs

ENGINE TYPE:Single Cylinder, 4 Stroke, DOHC, Water Cooled
DISPLACEMENT:452cc
BORE X STROKE:84×81.5mm
COMPRESSION RATIO:11.5:1
VALVES:Shim under bucket
MAX POWER:39.5 Hp (29.44 kW) @ 8000 rpm
MAX TORQUE:29.5 ft-lbs @5500 rpm
CLUTCH:Wet multiplate, Slip & Assist
GEARBOX:6-speed
LUBRICATION: Semi-dry sump
FUEL SYSTEM:Electronic Fuel Injection, 42mm throttle body, Ride by Wire
ENGINE START:Electric 
FRAME TYPE:Twin Spar Tubular Steel Frame engine as stressed member
FRONT SUSPENSION:Showa USD 43mm Forks 7.9 in Wheel Travel
REAR SUSPENSION:Showa Monoshock with Linkage, 7.9 in  Wheel Travel 
WHEELBASE:59.44 in
GROUND CLEARANCE:9.1 in
LENGTH:88.4 in
WIDTH:33.5 in
HEIGHT:51.8 in
SEAT HEIGHT:32.5-33.3 in (standard seat); 31.7-32.5 in (low seat option)
CURB WEIGHT:432 lbs (@ 90% fuel)
FUEL CAPACITY:4.5 gallons
FRONT TIRE:90/90-21″
REAR TIRE:140/80-17″
FRONT BRAKES:320 mm Disc, 2-Piston Floating Caliper 
REAR BRAKES:270 mm Disc, Single Piston Floating Caliper 
ABS:Dual Channel ABS Switchable With Rear Wheel Deactivation
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM:12V – DC 
BATTERY:12V, 8 AH MF 
HEADLAMP:LED
TAIL LAMP:Integrated turn & tail lamp, all LED
TURN SIGNAL LAMP:Integrated turn & tail lamp, all LED

Gear We Used

Helmet: Arai XD-4
Jacket: Mosko Moto Rak Pullover
Pants: Mosko Moto Basilisk
Gloves: REV’IT! Massif
Boots: Gaerne SG-12

Author: Rob Dabney

Rob Dabney started a lifelong obsession with motorcycles at the age of 15 when he purchased his first bike – a 1982 Honda MB5. Through his 20’s and 30’s he competed in off-road desert races, including the Baja 250, 500 and 1000. Eventually, his proclivity for exploration led him to dual sport and adventure riding. Rob’s never-ending quest to discover what’s around the next bend has taken him on Adventures in Latin America, Africa, Europe, Asia, and throughout the American West. As a moto journalist, he enjoys inspiring others to seek adventure across horizons both near and far.

Author: Rob Dabney
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Quin Marais
Quin Marais
November 14, 2023 3:51 pm

Good one RobD . So who will be the first/best Indian Tour Company at the Indian Himalayas itself, to offer this 2024 bike for it’s tours?

Steve
Steve
November 14, 2023 4:14 pm

I made it 3 paragraphs in and I’m like: YOOOOOO! Lemmey get one auh dezzzzz.

Eric Kramer
Eric Kramer
November 14, 2023 5:27 pm

Great review, but after meeting the factory team in Tucson az last Saturday for a factory ride….. I was told that bike will not be in the USA for about a year…..

Jeff
Jeff
November 14, 2023 6:43 pm

Great review! It’s an impressive little machine!

Kai
Kai
November 14, 2023 9:27 pm

Ok KTM, here is Royal Enfield showing you what you should have done with the 390 several years ago. Offering an R version with good offroad performance by upgrading suspension and wheels to 18/21!

Marty Ridgeway
Marty Ridgeway
December 1, 2023 5:23 am
Reply to  Kai

Comparing an RE to a KTM is laughable.

Kai
Kai
November 14, 2023 9:30 pm

Regarding the ABS: I guess it`s really just possible to switch the rear off. It’s not a real offroad ABS that also modulates the front break differently in offroad setting? Guess that’s a too high expectation considering the price tag!

Chuck
Chuck
November 16, 2023 4:18 pm

Glad you were able to get a new one off the rack. Now that ItchyBoots has done all of India first on the same bike and has accomplished more than this trip .

Scott Maxwell
Scott Maxwell
November 21, 2023 11:57 am
Reply to  Chuck

Ok fanboy LOL.

Bob
Bob
November 17, 2023 3:04 pm

Is there any mention of how much wattage is available from the alternator / rectifier? If yes , how much of that is used to power the cycle? That is, what’s on tap for aftermarket electric goodies?

Rob Dabney
Rob Dabney
November 21, 2023 12:04 pm
Reply to  Bob

They’ve not mentioned that before. I’ve got an outstanding question about that with RE but haven’t heard back yet. The old stator was pretty good at 220W output. And with all-LED lighting, there shouldn’t be as much drain on the power. Will let you know when I hear something.

Bob
Bob
November 17, 2023 3:16 pm

CF Moto MT450: More Power, Less Weight!

Vishnumohan Nair
Vishnumohan Nair
November 29, 2023 12:11 am
Reply to  Bob

Reducing the weight of a bike is actually pretty simple, Use Plastic or other lighter material instead of steel. Then it becomes a question of how good it will be when dropped and how much it will cost to repair the bike. Plus any offroad ride tends to be 70% on road and 30% offroad, it is better to have a 180 kg plus bike on highways to avoid wind buffeting when heavy trucks pass by. I find wind buffeting on highways on a lighter bike more scary then any bad trail offroad

Vishnumohan Nair
Vishnumohan Nair
November 29, 2023 12:07 am

Going by How they have priced it in UK and India and previous pricing strategy, I predict it will start at 6000 USD in the US.

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