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ADV NewsWatch: 2024 Honda XL750 Transalp Tested

Watch: 2024 Honda XL750 Transalp Tested

We ride the new mid-size adventurer to see how it matches up in the market.

Published on 12.15.2023

The Transalp returns to the Honda lineup after a three-decades-long absence in the US. Quite a lot has changed since the days of Friday night VHS Blockbuster rentals, and the new Transalp is no different. The 755cc parallel twin, 8-valve Unicam engine now makes 83 horsepower (90.5 horsepower in Euro spec), mated to a 6-speed transmission, featuring an assist/slipper clutch — both of which are mounted as a stressed member in a steel-constructed diamond frame. 

Honda XL750 Transalp Video Review

Electronic rider aids run via Throttle by Wire and include five riding modes, four of which contain preset combinations of Engine Power, Engine Braking, ABS, and Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) with integrated Wheelie Control. A fifth “User” mode allows the rider to choose his or her preferred combination using a modern 5″ color TFT display and thumb controls.

Honda XL750 Transalp Video Review

For the suspension, 43mm Showa inverted forks offer 7.9 inches of wheel travel up front and the rear is a remote-reservoir Showa shock with a Pro-Link linkage system delivering 7.5 inches of travel. This translates into a seat height of 33.7 inches and 8.3 inches of ground clearance riding on dirt-friendly 21″ front and 18″ rear spoked wheels, stopped by dual 310mm discs in front and a single 256mm disc in the rear, modulated with a two-mode selectable ABS.

Honda XL750 Transalp Video Review

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Honda’s new XL750 Transalp is all updated, and ready to rumble in the increasingly-competitive middleweight adventure segment. But is it still the same approachable, dependable, capable adventure bike of yore? Is it ready to go head-to-head with bikes in the category like the Yamaha Tenere 700 and KLR? Will it shake up the segment with a budget-friendly MSRP of $9,999? We have answers to all your burning questions and more for this all-new adventure bike for 2024. 

Thanks for checking out the video and let us know your thoughts and questions in the comments below. For those of you who don’t mind a little reading, you can also check out our full review article of the 2024 Honda XL750 Transalp here.

Author: ADV Pulse Staff
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pnr
pnr
December 16, 2023 2:45 pm

non adjustable suspension, not buying

FastCorner
FastCorner
December 20, 2023 10:03 am
Reply to  pnr

I hear you, but that is so fixable. Outside of buying replacement forks, changing oil type and adding spaces (the old trick) can really make a difference and change “tuning”. But I agree, that’s a big miss by Honda.

Chris
Chris
December 16, 2023 2:51 pm

Great video and good review. Thanks for that! I rode the original Transalp years ago-fun bike. I rode the new version a few weeks ago and was impressed. Very low center of gravity that allowed the bike to corner and track well on a sketchy hard pack dirt road. Would be great if it had cc and an easier way to defeat the traction control, but i sort of get it… price point. The seat sucks and the bars are a bit too street oriented for my liking. It feels heavy until you start moving then very planted and the weight disappears. If your focus is more off road go for a T7 but if you want a nice street bike that can handle moderate off road the Transalp is a good choice for 10k. If i were to purchase one i would change the seat and bars, add a skid plate, grip heaters and call it a day.

Joe John
Joe John
December 18, 2023 5:05 am

All they had to do was run the exhaust to the side and they could have gotten another 2 – 3 inch of ground clearance.

Lloyd Bernberg
Lloyd Bernberg
December 18, 2023 11:11 pm
Reply to  Joe John

Hiding behind the catalytic convertor is a very pointed sump which would preclude increased ground clearance.

Screenshot-2023-12-18-at-11.08.49 PM
Sstiingya
Sstiingya
January 27, 2024 12:08 am
Reply to  Lloyd Bernberg

But all they had to do there was not use a shared part from the Hornet. (why in the Heck does the Hornet need it this way?) They cheaped out/aimed at too low of a price point when they could have given us adjustable suspension and fixed the ground clearance and still had a very reasonably priced bike. (and also designed it’s own headlight or at least used the ones from the Africa Twin so the bike didn’t have to be so MEH)

Dusty
Dusty
January 4, 2024 2:18 am

Why did you only evaluate it on dirt….ones has to travel more miles on pavement to get to the good stuff.

James Parker
James Parker
January 4, 2024 9:12 am
Reply to  Dusty

He did. Watch the whole video.

soltan
soltan
February 11, 2024 11:09 am

Thank you for a great review. Looks like a fun bike to ride.

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