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ADV NewsHusqvarna Unveils All-New 701 LR With Long Range Capabilities

Husqvarna Unveils All-New 701 LR With Long Range Capabilities

 Added fuel capacity bumps the Husky 701 range to more than 300 miles!

Published on 11.07.2019

Husqvarna has pulled the wraps off its 2020 lineup and there are some surprises for the dual sport/adventure rider crowds. We’ve already written about the stunning Norden 901 adventure concept, which may or may not actually see production (fingers crossed it will). But the revised, refined and updated 701 models are not vaporware, and there’s one version in particular that should interest riders seeking a bike that can go the distance: The 701 LR. The LR stands for “long range,” and with a claimed ability to cover 500 kilometers (310 miles) between fill ups, the 701 LR can scratch that itch.

Husqvarna 701 Enduro LR
The 701 LR features new advanced electronics and a claimed ability to cover 310 miles between fill ups.

The 701 lineup consists of the Supermoto, Enduro and Enduro LR. All three get updated electronic aids that Husqvarna says will improve both safety and performance. There are new switchable ride modes, a Bosch cornering ABS system that takes lean angle into account, a new “easy” shift feature that shortens gear changes and supposedly improves rear wheel traction, lean-sensitive traction control, and new slimmer bodywork for improved ergonomics. The engine is still a 74-horsepower, throttle-by-wire, 692cc powerhouse. It’s all good stuff, improving a bike that’s already a standout among dual sport and adventure enthusiasts.

Husqvarna 701 LR traction control
New switchable Ride Modes allow riders to change power characteristics on the fly.

The LR model adds a separate 12-liter (3.2 gallon) fuel tank to the bike, located where you’d find a traditional fuel tank, in front of the seat. (The 701s, like KTM 690s, carry their fuel in the combination tank/subframe that supports the seat.) Dual, switchable fuel pumps allow the rider to pull gas from either tank. Videos of the bike show the tank flaring around the radiator like a shroud, similar to some of the larger aftermarket tanks. Combined with the rear tank’s 13 liters (3.4 gallons), the total capacity of 25 liters should be good for just about anywhere you’d want to ride.

Husqvarna 701 LR additional fuel tank
An additional fully-integrated 12 liter front tank increases the total fuel capacity to 25 liters (6.6 gallons).

Technical Highlights

  • Dual fuel tank set up for a total capacity of 25 liters (6.6 gallons)
  • Switchable Ride Modes – change power characteristics while riding
  • Bosch cornering ABS – lean angle specific braking technology
  • Easy Shift function – shorter shift times & improved rear wheel traction
  • Lean-angle sensitive Motorcycle Traction Control – perfect rear wheel traction
  • New graphics & slim bodywork – carefully engineered ergonomics
Husqvarna 701 LR brembo brakes

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For the sake of comparison, that’s over a gallon more than a KTM 790 Adventure. Which means that Husqvarna has essentially built the adventure bike fans of the big single have been clamoring for since KTM introduced the platform in 2008. With some added wind protection, this Husky could stake a claim to finally being a modern version of the legendary KTM 640 Adventure. That bike carried 7.4 gallons of fuel, but it was carbureted and didn’t get the fuel mileage the 701 should return. Add in all the other features modern technology has brought, and it really does look like Husqvarna has built a worthy successor. 

WATCH: Husqvarna 701 LR live at EICMA.

Husqvarna 701 LR Specs

displacement692.7 cc
Power55 kW (73.8 hp)
design1-cylinder, 4 stroke engine
bore105 mm
STROKE80 mm
starterElectric
transmission6-speed
coolingliquid cooled
clutch APTC (TM) slipper clutch
rear suspensionWP shock absorber Pro-Lever linkage
Suspension travel (front)250 mm
suspension travel (rear)250 mm
front brake Brembo twin-piston floating caliper, brake disc
rear brakeBrembo single-piston floating caliper, brake disc
front brake disc diameter300 mm
rear brake disc diameter240 mm
absBosch 9ME combined ABS
ChainX-Ring 5/8 x 1/4″
Wheel front/rear21″/18″
ground clearance270 mm
seat height925 mm (36.4 in)
tank capacity (approx.)25 L (6.6 gallons)
weight without fuel155 kg (341.7 lbs)

Author: Bob Whitby

Bob has been riding motorcycles since age 19 and working as a journalist since he was 24, which was a long time ago, let’s put it that way. He quit for the better part of a decade to raise a family, then rediscovered adventure, dual sport and enduro riding in the early 2000s. He lives in Arkansas, America’s best-kept secret when it comes to riding destinations, and travels far and wide in search of dirt roads and trails.

Author: Bob Whitby
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9 thoughts on “Husqvarna Unveils All-New 701 LR With Long Range Capabilities

  1. Anyone heard whether the front tank setup from the 2020 LR model will be available separately and be able to be fit to a 2019 Enduro model, and if so, what it might cost?

    • Rade’s Garage makes a 1.5 gal aux tank for 2016-2019 701s. I went with the 790 R, and love the TFT, Bluetooth, and Cruise Control. Hope the 901 gets all the fancy electronics. Give me more suspension, great electronics, less weight, and more range; I don’t need more horsepower.

  2. For us European riders this to my knowledge the only road legal solution to increase the range of the 701. All other tanks are not homologated and would require an immense testing and certification effort. I know that some people give a shit about that, but in countries like Germany you get serious problems if caught with any kinds of modifications that are not in the papers. Also I prefer a factory solution, that keeps the full warranty – I doubt any manufacturer will give you warranty on the engine if e g the original airbox has been removed. And while for most regions in Europe 500km reach are not really necessary – the further north you get the less dense the gas station network becomes. This summer I was glad I could buy another 5l of gas, because the only pump in Mehamn was shut down and I did not want to risk getting stuck somewhere up there – and still be able to ride up to Slettnes Fyr and back.

  3. PS: what I don’t understand is why they made the bike even 5mm higher! It is clearly aimed at long distance adventure travel, so a bit lower would have made handling with the additional weight of luggage easier and make it more accessible to shorter folks like me. So I admit: if the 701LR should be the next bike after my beloved 790@R I would need to lower it one inch.

  4. this is a really good move by Husky/ktm because that Norden 901 monstrosity will tank in sales. I can’t believe Husky was dumb enough to use a cafe racer hipster design studio to try (unsuccessfully) to create a modern mid-weight adventure bike to compete with KTMs lineup. The Norden looks goofy, is bulky, outdated and strange as well over metaled. That dysfunctional gigantic round headlight is the ugliest thing iv’e ever seen not to mention heavy. The over all look is a poor attempt. If Husky wanted to do something incredible they would have copied the aftermarket Rally designs being made for the 701 and apply those trend setting and highly functional designs into a 901. My 8+ year old KTM 990 adventure is not only more sexy, stylish than this Norden goof- but my 990 is also more functional and would destroy that strange hipster sled.

  5. Smart move Husky, but too late for me. I almost bought a 701 last year but waited for the 790R with fuel capacity being one of several reasons I did. I recently did an 1,100 mile 3-day trip on my 790 and cruise control was well worth having. The 790 TFT with Bluetooth caller ID and ability to change settings while moving in Rally mode are awesome. The 901 needs all this technology. The perfect bike would have been an 801 (701 colors on a 790 Rally with a 5-10 liter rear aux tank added). The 790 engine has more than enough power, even 2 up on the highway. I kept my DRZ400 for when the 790R is in the shop! My only issue so far with my 790 is the fuel gauge is now stuck on empty, but I’ve ridden my DRZ for 12 years with no fuel gauge. DRZ needs a fuel stop at 100 miles, 790R at 240, and I bet the 701LR will be around 280, all with ample reserves. My 790 averages 50-55 mpg, can get 60 mpg cruising at 50 mph but that doesn’t happen. It likes to go fast! Also, speedometer on 790 shows 80 mph when GPS reads 75, but better than DRZ where 80 is really 73 and there is no 6th gear.